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Peach Sorbet on a Summer’s Day

Peach SorbetIn the last few weeks, I’ve had a desire to make a new sorbet recipe. Every visit to the store I would check out the produce section, looking for some fruit that I hadn’t made a sorbet with before. At some point I want to try out a kiwi or melon sorbet, but I have been in the mood for something a little less subtle lately. I’ve also been tempted to cruise the local fruit stand, where I can always find fruits and berries never seen at the supermarket. As fate would have it, a coworker at my new job would intervene with several bags of peaches from her yard. Peaches in hand, I went in looking for a recipe for peach sorbet.

In Search of the Perfect Recipe
I was surprised to discover that there weren’t any peach sorbet recipes in my library of cookbooks, so I went online for some ideas. It turns out that the internet wasn’t too great a resource either, though I did find a good recipe at Pinch My Salt. Most of the other recipes I found contained additional water and also called for brandy, amaretto or marsala liqueurs. Having made peach ice cream a decade ago with almond extract (should have used amaretto!), I can attest to the successful pairing of peaches with these kinds of flavors, but I wanted a recipe for peach sorbet that was light and fresh. With a few ideas, I set out to create my own recipe.

The Rational Recipe
Many peach sorbets called for either orange or lemon juice, so I opted for both. I hoped that the orange juice would broaden the delicate peach flavor a little while the lemon juice would add to the freshness factor. I originally planned to add a cup of water to the sorbet, as seen in the ingredients photo below, but later decided against it. I can understand adding water for lemon sorbet, but peaches have such a delicate flavor it seemed silly to dilute them. This just left me with a liqueur to choose. I’ve made sorbets with and without liqueur, and I swear by the extra complexity and, more importantly, the softer texture that alcohol lends to a sorbet. I was reluctant to just go with just limoncello since I was afraid it the lemon flavor would outshine the peach. In the end I decided to go with a mix of Grand Marnier and limoncello.

The Results are in…
To my astonishment, I actually accomplished what I set out to do! This sorbet is bright and refreshing—perfect for a hot summer’s day. Like a lot of sorbets, this peach sorbet recipe is no-cook, so you can whip it up in no time and be eating it for dessert. The peaches I used are pretty small, so if you use larger peaches you can reduce the number to about nine or ten. The goal is to get about 4 cups of loosely packed, sliced peaches—and I’m not talking about canned!


Ingredients for making Peach Sorbet.


Pour the juice from one orange and one lemon into blender.


Peel and pit around 16 small peaches and add to the juice the in blender.


Pour 1 1/3 cups of sugar into blender.


Add 2 tablespoons of limoncello.


Add 3 tablespoons of Grand Marnier.


Purée peach mixture until smooth, about 1 minute.


After chilling mixture to less than 45° F, freeze according to your ice cream maker’s instructions.


Transfer frozen sorbet to dedicated container to ripen in freezer.

The recipe pictured above, with detailed instructions and complete photo gallery can be found on the Peach Sorbet recipe page.

  • http://pinchmysalt.com Nicole

    The recipe sounds really great! I’ll have to try adding the liquor next time I make it! Thanks for the link!

  • http://gruelomelet.blogspot.com/ Cheryl

    This just screams summer. Gorgeous light color and looks so incredibly good.

  • http://www.chocolategourmand.com Brian

    Nicole: Adding liqueur is something I don’t even think about, anymore. I just do it for sorbets since the subtle complexity it adds is so nice and, more importantly, the texture is nice and soft, even after a week in the freezer.

    Cheryl: I had heard and seen examples of peach sorbet coming out darker than expected, so I was glad this came out brightly peach colored. I’m guessing it comes down to the kind of peaches used since most peach sorbet recipes don’t involve any cooking.

  • http://www.jumboempanadas.blogspot.com brilynn

    I can’t wait until the peaches are in season here so that I can give this a try!

  • http://thisdamecooks.wordpress.com JoAnn

    Fabulous sorbet recipes, especially the cranberry with Gran Marnier. Try this one: Plums with Tawny Port. I use canned plums and 1/4 cup port.
    This is my first visit to your site. Its filled with all the things I love to make and eat…and the photos are terrific. I a

  • Deena

    The I used a lime instead and added a little zest since the lime was a little dry. This was a delicious summer treat I will surely make again.